The Next Issue of The Chamber Magazine Comes Out February 3 at 10:00 a.m. US Central Time

The Chamber Magazine: Contemporary Dark Fiction and Poetry--The Strange and Dark and Beautiful
  • Fiction
    • “Unknown Worlds” Horror by Patrick McEvoy
    • “Making Ends Meat” Dark Fiction by Philip Finkelstein
    • “There but for the Beasts” Dark, Psychological Fiction by David Connor
    • “To Drive a Spirit In” Supernatural Dark Fiction by Aly Rusciano
    • “Frost” Horror by Dena Linn
    • “The Rtist” Dark Fiction by Karris Rae
    • “The Integration of Noah Bloom” Horror by Lexie Garcia
    • “Legacy” Dark, Supernatural Fiction by Evan Kaiser
    • “The Face in the Mirror” Horror by Z.F. Douglas
    • “The Tap Room” Dark Fiction by James W. Morris
    • “The Flat Share” Dark, Supernatural Fiction by J.L. Corbett
  • Flash Fiction
    • “Lover” Dark Flash Horror by Alan Caldwell
    • “Truth Reigns in the Dark” Surreal Dark Flash Fiction by Marie-Louise McGuinness
  • Poetry
    • Three Dark Poems by Jon Humphreys: “I, Phone”, “William”, and “Muse”

The Next Issue of The Chamber Magazine Comes Out February 3 at 10:00 a.m. US Central Time

The Chamber Magazine: Contemporary Dark Fiction and Poetry--The Strange and Dark and Beautiful
  • Fiction
    • “Unknown Worlds” Horror by Patrick McEvoy
    • “Making Ends Meat” Dark Fiction by Philip Finkelstein
    • “There but for the Beasts” Dark, Psychological Fiction by David Connor
    • “To Drive a Spirit In” Supernatural Dark Fiction by Aly Rusciano
    • “Frost” Horror by Dena Linn
    • “The Rtist” Dark Fiction by Karris Rae
    • “The Integration of Noah Bloom” Horror by Lexie Garcia
    • “Legacy” Dark, Supernatural Fiction by Evan Kaiser
    • “The Face in the Mirror” Horror by Z.F. Douglas
    • “The Tap Room” Dark Fiction by James W. Morris
    • “The Flat Share” Dark, Supernatural Fiction by J.L. Corbett
  • Flash Fiction
    • “Lover” Dark Flash Horror by Alan Caldwell
    • “Truth Reigns in the Dark” Surreal Dark Flash Fiction by Marie-Louise McGuinness
  • Poetry
    • Three Dark Poems by Jon Humphreys: “I, Phone”, “William”, and “Muse”

The Next Issue of The Chamber Magazine Comes Out February 3 at 10:00 a.m. US Central Time

The Chamber Magazine: Contemporary Dark Fiction and Poetry--The Strange and Dark and Beautiful
  • Fiction
    • “Unknown Worlds” Horror by Patrick McEvoy
    • “Making Ends Meat” Dark Fiction by Philip Finkelstein
    • “There but for the Beasts” Dark, Psychological Fiction by David Connor
    • “To Drive a Spirit In” Supernatural Dark Fiction by Aly Rusciano
    • “Frost” Horror by Dena Linn
    • “The Rtist” Dark Fiction by Karris Rae
    • “The Integration of Noah Bloom” Horror by Lexie Garcia
    • “Legacy” Dark, Supernatural Fiction by Evan Kaiser
    • “The Face in the Mirror” Horror by Z.F. Douglas
    • “The Tap Room” Dark Fiction by James W. Morris
    • “The Flat Share” Dark, Supernatural Fiction by J.L. Corbett
  • Flash Fiction
    • “Lover” Dark Flash Horror by Alan Caldwell
    • “Truth Reigns in the Dark” Surreal Dark Flash Fiction by Marie-Louise McGuinness
  • Poetry
    • Three Dark Poems by Jon Humphreys: “I, Phone”, “William”, and “Muse”

The Next Issue of The Chamber Magazine Comes Out February 3 at 10:00 a.m. US Central Time

The Chamber Magazine: Contemporary Dark Fiction and Poetry--The Strange and Dark and Beautiful
  • Fiction
    • “Unknown Worlds” Horror by Patrick McEvoy
    • “Making Ends Meat” Dark Fiction by Philip Finkelstein
    • “There but for the Beasts” Dark, Psychological Fiction by David Connor
    • “To Drive a Spirit In” Supernatural Dark Fiction by Aly Rusciano
    • “Frost” Horror by Dena Linn
    • “The Rtist” Dark Fiction by Karris Rae
    • “The Integration of Noah Bloom” Horror by Lexie Garcia
    • “Legacy” Dark, Supernatural Fiction by Evan Kaiser
    • “The Face in the Mirror” Horror by Z.F. Douglas
    • “The Tap Room” Dark Fiction by James W. Morris
    • “The Flat Share” Dark, Supernatural Fiction by J.L. Corbett
  • Flash Fiction
    • “Lover” Dark Flash Horror by Alan Caldwell
    • “Truth Reigns in the Dark” Surreal Dark Flash Fiction by Marie-Louise McGuinness
  • Poetry
    • Three Dark Poems by Jon Humphreys: “I, Phone”, “William”, and “Muse”

Rural Fiction Magazine is Seeking Submissions

Rural Fiction Magazine, a sister publication of The Chamber, is seeking submissions. As with The Chamber, there is no pay except exposure, and, as with The Chamber, Rural Fiction Magazine (RFM) is endeavoring to reach a worldwide audience and is therefore seeking submissions from around the world. If you have something you think would interest an educated rural readership, please consider submitting it to RFM. Currently, the guidelines are essentially the same as The Chamber’s guidelines with few exceptions. For example, the word limit is 5,000 while The Chamber’s is 7,500, but with time RFM’s limit may increase.

What kind of material is RFM seeking? While The Chamber publishes primarily stories and poems of a dark nature, RFM hopes to publish works somewhat more upbeat. With RFM, as with The Chamber, genre is not important. RFM wants any material that might appeal to an educated rural audience.

RFM wants to rise above the long-held stereotypes of a rural populace being illiterate, uncultured, and narrow-minded and show that today’s rural populations tend to be educated and often very successful businesspeople. Rural people are no longer a lone farmer breaking the sod with a pair of horses pulling a plow over a few acres as they did 200 years ago. The rural landowner now operates combines and other equipment worth hundreds of thousands of dollars over hundreds or even thousands of acres. Rural workers are no longer illiterate sharecroppers but often have advanced college degrees in a wide variety of subjects. And rural people are no longer only farmers but may work or own businesses in any of hundreds of industries from trucking to shrimping to commercial fishing to the oil industry to any of hundreds of other examples. These are the people to which RFM wants to appeal.

Works submitted to RFM do not have to concern themselves solely with subjects of a beautiful or dramatic nature. Any topic that would be of interest to an educated rural populace is welcome, whether it is drama, tragedy, comedy, fantasy, mystery, folktale, legend, myth, historical, ghost stories, or anything at all. If in doubt, send it.

Thank you for your time and please seriously consider submitting to RFM.


Rural Fiction Magazine is Seeking Submissions

Rural Fiction Magazine, a sister publication of The Chamber, is seeking submissions. As with The Chamber, there is no pay except exposure, and, as with The Chamber, Rural Fiction Magazine (RFM) is endeavoring to reach a worldwide audience and is therefore seeking submissions from around the world. If you have something you think would interest an educated rural readership, please consider submitting it to RFM. Currently, the guidelines are essentially the same as The Chamber’s guidelines with few exceptions. For example, the word limit is 5,000 while The Chamber’s is 7,500, but with time RFM’s limit may increase.

What kind of material is RFM seeking? While The Chamber publishes primarily stories and poems of a dark nature, RFM hopes to publish works somewhat more upbeat. With RFM, as with The Chamber, genre is not important. RFM wants any material that might appeal to an educated rural audience.

RFM wants to rise above the long-held stereotypes of a rural populace being illiterate, uncultured, and narrow-minded and show that today’s rural populations tend to be educated and often very successful businesspeople. Rural people are no longer a lone farmer breaking the sod with a pair of horses pulling a plow over a few acres as they did 200 years ago. The rural landowner now operates combines and other equipment worth hundreds of thousands of dollars over hundreds or even thousands of acres. Rural workers are no longer illiterate sharecroppers but often have advanced college degrees in a wide variety of subjects. And rural people are no longer only farmers but may work or own businesses in any of hundreds of industries from trucking to shrimping to commercial fishing to the oil industry to any of hundreds of other examples. These are the people to which RFM wants to appeal.

Works submitted to RFM do not have to concern themselves solely with subjects of a beautiful or dramatic nature. Any topic that would be of interest to an educated rural populace is welcome, whether it is drama, tragedy, comedy, fantasy, mystery, folktale, legend, myth, historical, ghost stories, or anything at all. If in doubt, send it.

Thank you for your time and please seriously consider submitting to RFM.


Rural Fiction Magazine is Seeking Submissions

Rural Fiction Magazine, a sister publication of The Chamber, is seeking submissions. As with The Chamber, there is no pay except exposure, and, as with The Chamber, Rural Fiction Magazine (RFM) is endeavoring to reach a worldwide audience and is therefore seeking submissions from around the world. If you have something you think would interest an educated rural readership, please consider submitting it to RFM. Currently, the guidelines are essentially the same as The Chamber’s guidelines with few exceptions. For example, the word limit is 5,000 while The Chamber’s is 7,500, but with time RFM’s limit may increase.

What kind of material is RFM seeking? While The Chamber publishes primarily stories and poems of a dark nature, RFM hopes to publish works somewhat more upbeat. With RFM, as with The Chamber, genre is not important. RFM wants any material that might appeal to an educated rural audience.

RFM wants to rise above the long-held stereotypes of a rural populace being illiterate, uncultured, and narrow-minded and show that today’s rural populations tend to be educated and often very successful businesspeople. Rural people are no longer a lone farmer breaking the sod with a pair of horses pulling a plow over a few acres as they did 200 years ago. The rural landowner now operates combines and other equipment worth hundreds of thousands of dollars over hundreds or even thousands of acres. Rural workers are no longer illiterate sharecroppers but often have advanced college degrees in a wide variety of subjects. And rural people are no longer only farmers but may work or own businesses in any of hundreds of industries from trucking to shrimping to commercial fishing to the oil industry to any of hundreds of other examples. These are the people to which RFM wants to appeal.

Works submitted to RFM do not have to concern themselves solely with subjects of a beautiful or dramatic nature. Any topic that would be of interest to an educated rural populace is welcome, whether it is drama, tragedy, comedy, fantasy, mystery, folktale, legend, myth, historical, ghost stories, or anything at all. If in doubt, send it.

Thank you for your time and please seriously consider submitting to RFM.


Rural Fiction Magazine is Seeking Submissions

Rural Fiction Magazine, a sister publication of The Chamber, is seeking submissions. As with The Chamber, there is no pay except exposure, and, as with The Chamber, Rural Fiction Magazine (RFM) is endeavoring to reach a worldwide audience and is therefore seeking submissions from around the world. If you have something you think would interest an educated rural readership, please consider submitting it to RFM. Currently, the guidelines are essentially the same as The Chamber’s guidelines with few exceptions. For example, the word limit is 5,000 while The Chamber’s is 7,500, but with time RFM’s limit may increase.

What kind of material is RFM seeking? While The Chamber publishes primarily stories and poems of a dark nature, RFM hopes to publish works somewhat more upbeat. With RFM, as with The Chamber, genre is not important. RFM wants any material that might appeal to an educated rural audience.

RFM wants to rise above the long-held stereotypes of a rural populace being illiterate, uncultured, and narrow-minded and show that today’s rural populations tend to be educated and often very successful businesspeople. Rural people are no longer a lone farmer breaking the sod with a pair of horses pulling a plow over a few acres as they did 200 years ago. The rural landowner now operates combines and other equipment worth hundreds of thousands of dollars over hundreds or even thousands of acres. Rural workers are no longer illiterate sharecroppers but often have advanced college degrees in a wide variety of subjects. And rural people are no longer only farmers but may work or own businesses in any of hundreds of industries from trucking to shrimping to commercial fishing to the oil industry to any of hundreds of other examples. These are the people to which RFM wants to appeal.

Works submitted to RFM do not have to concern themselves solely with subjects of a beautiful or dramatic nature. Any topic that would be of interest to an educated rural populace is welcome, whether it is drama, tragedy, comedy, fantasy, mystery, folktale, legend, myth, historical, ghost stories, or anything at all. If in doubt, send it.

Thank you for your time and please seriously consider submitting to RFM.


Rural Fiction Magazine is Seeking Submissions

Rural Fiction Magazine, a sister publication of The Chamber, is seeking submissions. As with The Chamber, there is no pay except exposure, and, as with The Chamber, Rural Fiction Magazine (RFM) is endeavoring to reach a worldwide audience and is therefore seeking submissions from around the world. If you have something you think would interest an educated rural readership, please consider submitting it to RFM. Currently, the guidelines are essentially the same as The Chamber’s guidelines with few exceptions. For example, the word limit is 5,000 while The Chamber’s is 7,500, but with time RFM’s limit may increase.

What kind of material is RFM seeking? While The Chamber publishes primarily stories and poems of a dark nature, RFM hopes to publish works somewhat more upbeat. With RFM, as with The Chamber, genre is not important. RFM wants any material that might appeal to an educated rural audience.

RFM wants to rise above the long-held stereotypes of a rural populace being illiterate, uncultured, and narrow-minded and show that today’s rural populations tend to be educated and often very successful businesspeople. Rural people are no longer a lone farmer breaking the sod with a pair of horses pulling a plow over a few acres as they did 200 years ago. The rural landowner now operates combines and other equipment worth hundreds of thousands of dollars over hundreds or even thousands of acres. Rural workers are no longer illiterate sharecroppers but often have advanced college degrees in a wide variety of subjects. And rural people are no longer only farmers but may work or own businesses in any of hundreds of industries from trucking to shrimping to commercial fishing to the oil industry to any of hundreds of other examples. These are the people to which RFM wants to appeal.

Works submitted to RFM do not have to concern themselves solely with subjects of a beautiful or dramatic nature. Any topic that would be of interest to an educated rural populace is welcome, whether it is drama, tragedy, comedy, fantasy, mystery, folktale, legend, myth, historical, ghost stories, or anything at all. If in doubt, send it.

Thank you for your time and please seriously consider submitting to RFM.


Rural Fiction Magazine is Seeking Submissions

Rural Fiction Magazine, a sister publication of The Chamber, is seeking submissions. As with The Chamber, there is no pay except exposure, and, as with The Chamber, Rural Fiction Magazine (RFM) is endeavoring to reach a worldwide audience and is therefore seeking submissions from around the world. If you have something you think would interest an educated rural readership, please consider submitting it to RFM. Currently, the guidelines are essentially the same as The Chamber’s guidelines with few exceptions. For example, the word limit is 5,000 while The Chamber’s is 7,500, but with time RFM’s limit may increase.

What kind of material is RFM seeking? While The Chamber publishes primarily stories and poems of a dark nature, RFM hopes to publish works somewhat more upbeat. With RFM, as with The Chamber, genre is not important. RFM wants any material that might appeal to an educated rural audience.

RFM wants to rise above the long-held stereotypes of a rural populace being illiterate, uncultured, and narrow-minded and show that today’s rural populations tend to be educated and often very successful businesspeople. Rural people are no longer a lone farmer breaking the sod with a pair of horses pulling a plow over a few acres as they did 200 years ago. The rural landowner now operates combines and other equipment worth hundreds of thousands of dollars over hundreds or even thousands of acres. Rural workers are no longer illiterate sharecroppers but often have advanced college degrees in a wide variety of subjects. And rural people are no longer only farmers but may work or own businesses in any of hundreds of industries from trucking to shrimping to commercial fishing to the oil industry to any of hundreds of other examples. These are the people to which RFM wants to appeal.

Works submitted to RFM do not have to concern themselves solely with subjects of a beautiful or dramatic nature. Any topic that would be of interest to an educated rural populace is welcome, whether it is drama, tragedy, comedy, fantasy, mystery, folktale, legend, myth, historical, ghost stories, or anything at all. If in doubt, send it.

Thank you for your time and please seriously consider submitting to RFM.


Rural Fiction Magazine is Seeking Submissions

Rural Fiction Magazine, a sister publication of The Chamber, is seeking submissions. As with The Chamber, there is no pay except exposure, and, as with The Chamber, Rural Fiction Magazine (RFM) is endeavoring to reach a worldwide audience and is therefore seeking submissions from around the world. If you have something you think would interest an educated rural readership, please consider submitting it to RFM. Currently, the guidelines are essentially the same as The Chamber’s guidelines with few exceptions. For example, the word limit is 5,000 while The Chamber’s is 7,500, but with time RFM’s limit may increase.

What kind of material is RFM seeking? While The Chamber publishes primarily stories and poems of a dark nature, RFM hopes to publish works somewhat more upbeat. With RFM, as with The Chamber, genre is not important. RFM wants any material that might appeal to an educated rural audience.

RFM wants to rise above the long-held stereotypes of a rural populace being illiterate, uncultured, and narrow-minded and show that today’s rural populations tend to be educated and often very successful businesspeople. Rural people are no longer a lone farmer breaking the sod with a pair of horses pulling a plow over a few acres as they did 200 years ago. The rural landowner now operates combines and other equipment worth hundreds of thousands of dollars over hundreds or even thousands of acres. Rural workers are no longer illiterate sharecroppers but often have advanced college degrees in a wide variety of subjects. And rural people are no longer only farmers but may work or own businesses in any of hundreds of industries from trucking to shrimping to commercial fishing to the oil industry to any of hundreds of other examples. These are the people to which RFM wants to appeal.

Works submitted to RFM do not have to concern themselves solely with subjects of a beautiful or dramatic nature. Any topic that would be of interest to an educated rural populace is welcome, whether it is drama, tragedy, comedy, fantasy, mystery, folktale, legend, myth, historical, ghost stories, or anything at all. If in doubt, send it.

Thank you for your time and please seriously consider submitting to RFM.


The Chamber’s Nominations for The 2022 Pushcart Prize

Once again, I have slipped up. I expected the Pushcart Prize winners to be announced later than they were. I had intentions of releasing the names of my nominees prior to that, but I slipped up there too. In any event, I have not found a complete winners list yet, but as soon as I do, I will post the names of any Chamber winners immediately. If you have a list showing any winners from The Chamber, please send me a copy via email. In the meantime, here is the nomination letter I sent to the Pushcart Press. This was not an easy decision. The Chamber is full of talented and gifted writers. Selecting six out of the hundreds published is a challenging task.

I wish I could have nominated you all.

October 3, 2022
Pushcart Press
P.O. Box 380
Wainscott, NY 11975
631-324-9300

Dear Mr. Henderson,

I would like to nominate these six writers for the Pushcart Prize. Copies of their stories are enclosed. All of these were published in The Chamber Magazine during calendar year 2022.

1.	Patrick Crossen for “The Assistant” published September 2, 2022
2.	Peter Portelli for “Read the Sign” published August 5, 2022
3.	Gershon Ben-Avraham for “All’s Over Then” published June 3, 2022
4.	Alan Catlin for “All the Coney Islands of the Mind” published April 1, 2022
5.	J. Richard Kron for “A Vampire’s Internet Search History” published July 1, 2022
6.	Elinora Westfall for “The Bird Woman and the Silent Minority” published July 1, 2022

All of the nominated showed exceptional skill in writing and creativity. Their literary “voices” are distinct. To the best of my knowledge, none of these stories/poems were published previously.

The copies attached are how I received them. I don’t recall doing any editing for these, but if any was done, it was minimal, maybe correcting a typo or two.

Respectfully,


Phil Slattery, Publisher and Editor, The Chamber Magazine

Update: Buy Me a Coffee Site

New Twitter-proportioned Banner

I am making a subtle change to The Chamber’s overall organization. I will start previewing certain things (like next month’s cover) over at The Chamber’s Buy Me a Coffee site. I will test this a while and see how it goes. If there is enough interest and I can start to stay organized, I may have memberships there at a low rate, so donors can have access to plans and development and other stuff in advance of the main website and blog. I put a few posts up over there tonight, so you may want to hop over and check them out.

On another minor note, the banner above is one I designed to be used on Twitter or as a featured image on a post. After some experience with posting stories on this website, I have found that the featured image for a story (which may or may not be the one the reader sees at the top of a page) is the one that goes out to Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, and Tumbler. Cropping it to fit a Twitter post seems to be the best way to make it fit into all four social media sites. You may see this from time to time.

Please take a moment to review The Chamber

The Chamber Magazine Contemporary Dark Fiction and Poetry The Strange and Dark and Beautiful

I would like to take a moment from your busy day to ask a quick favor: could you please give The Chamber a quick, honest review on Google Business by following this link? Accumulating reviews is critical to the contemporary business world. Every one helps.

Also, the next time you see The Chamber mentioned somewhere online or in social media, could you grant The Chamber a quick, honest review also? Keeping The Chamber’s face in front of the public as much as possible helps build a devoted readership.

Thank you in advance for your assistance in this matter. I hope you have a great day.

Respectfully,

Phil Slattery, Publisher

Please take a moment to review The Chamber

The Chamber Magazine Contemporary Dark Fiction and Poetry The Strange and Dark and Beautiful

I would like to take a moment from your busy day to ask a quick favor: could you please give The Chamber a quick, honest review on Google Business by following this link? Accumulating reviews is critical to the contemporary business world. Every one helps.

Also, the next time you see The Chamber mentioned somewhere online or in social media, could you grant The Chamber a quick, honest review also? Keeping The Chamber’s face in front of the public as much as possible helps build a devoted readership.

Thank you in advance for your assistance in this matter. I hope you have a great day.

Respectfully,

Phil Slattery, Publisher

Now Taking Submissions for the October 7 Issue!

The Chamber Magazine: Contemporary Dark Fiction and Poetry is now taking submissions for the October 7 issue.

The Chamber is now taking submissions for the October 7 issue. Submissions for the September issue are closed. Halloween-related material is welcome but not required to submit. Please have your submission in before October 1. Be sure to include the genre and/or subgenre of your work in your cover letter along with the word count and a bio of approximately fifty words or less.

Check out the latest in our Bookshop and Gift Shop while you are here.

Horror Writers Association Membership Badge

Horror Writers Association

Just a quick note to ask everyone to note the Horror Writers Association Member badge in the upper right of the homepage. I have been a member of the HWA since 2016, but I let my membership lapse for a while. I renewed my membership yesterday and am proud to be showing the badge once again. If you would like to know more about the HWA, click the badge and you will be taken to their website.

New Page: Support

Support The Chamber Magazine

Today, I added a Support Page to The Chamber. Check it out. Below is the text from it.

You can support The Chamber in several ways.

Obviously, the first form of support that comes to anyone’s mind is financial support. You can do this through buying something from The Chamber’s gift shop or by making a financial donation through Stripe (in homepage sidebar) or through Buy Me a Book. The funds will be used to improve and upgrade The Chamber in many ways including Search Engine Optimization, web design, software for graphics and communication, advertising (possibly at a later date), and doubtlessly many others that are not occurring to my coffee-starved mind (it’s 8:43 a.m. as I write this).

However there are also other ways as well.

Share a story or poem. The most basic (and arguably the best and least expensive) form of publicity is by word of mouth. If you see a story or poem or article that you like, share it on social media. This can be as quick and easy as hitting a link below the story/poem. You can also mention The Chamber in any comments you make on other websites or social media. If you buy a t-shirt or other bit of merchandise from the gift shop, wear it in public at every opportunity. You are limited only by your imagination and the odds are you are creative are good as you are reading this magazine at the moment.

Another way to support The Chamber is to contribute something to be published. Of course, I will have to exercise editorial discretion over what is to be published, but the better your work is, the better the chance of it being published (don’t forget to check the guidelines for updates before you submit). The wider the variety of contributions, the more exposure the magazine receives. Don’t forget that The Chamber doesn’t publish only stories and poems, but reviews, interviews, articles, essays, and anything else that might be of interest to a reader of dark matter. They all have their own readership.

Don’t forget that The Chamber also has a nascent YouTube channel (. I wouldn’t mind publishing short videos there, which would also appear in the magazine as does any story or poem. So, you would get exposure not only on YouTube, but also in the online magazine.

I don’t know how I would work podcasts, but I am open to proposals.

Finally, another way you can contribute is by submitting ideas for the website or proposals for things to be published. I don’t have any way of compensating anyone for ideas or proposals, except for some type of exposure–maybe. If in doubt, submit.

At this time, The Chamber has no volunteer program, but that may be possible in the distant future.

Check this page occasionally as I will sporadically post updates and new ideas as the occur to me.

Thank you for your time.

Now Taking Submissions for the October 7 Issue!

The Chamber Magazine: Contemporary Dark Fiction and Poetry is now taking submissions for the October 7 issue.

The Chamber is now taking submissions for the October 7 issue. Submissions for the September issue are closed. Halloween-related material is welcome but not required to submit. Please have your submission in before October 1. Be sure to include the genre and/or subgenre of your work in your cover letter along with the word count and a bio of approximately fifty words or less.

Check out the latest in our Bookshop and Gift Shop while you are here.

New Page: Support

Support The Chamber Magazine

Today, I added a Support Page to The Chamber. Check it out. Below is the text from it.

You can support The Chamber in several ways.

Obviously, the first form of support that comes to anyone’s mind is financial support. You can do this through buying something from The Chamber’s gift shop or by making a financial donation through Stripe (in homepage sidebar) or through Buy Me a Book. The funds will be used to improve and upgrade The Chamber in many ways including Search Engine Optimization, web design, software for graphics and communication, advertising (possibly at a later date), and doubtlessly many others that are not occurring to my coffee-starved mind (it’s 8:43 a.m. as I write this).

However there are also other ways as well.

Share a story or poem. The most basic (and arguably the best and least expensive) form of publicity is by word of mouth. If you see a story or poem or article that you like, share it on social media. This can be as quick and easy as hitting a link below the story/poem. You can also mention The Chamber in any comments you make on other websites or social media. If you buy a t-shirt or other bit of merchandise from the gift shop, wear it in public at every opportunity. You are limited only by your imagination and the odds are you are creative are good as you are reading this magazine at the moment.

Another way to support The Chamber is to contribute something to be published. Of course, I will have to exercise editorial discretion over what is to be published, but the better your work is, the better the chance of it being published (don’t forget to check the guidelines for updates before you submit). The wider the variety of contributions, the more exposure the magazine receives. Don’t forget that The Chamber doesn’t publish only stories and poems, but reviews, interviews, articles, essays, and anything else that might be of interest to a reader of dark matter. They all have their own readership.

Don’t forget that The Chamber also has a nascent YouTube channel (. I wouldn’t mind publishing short videos there, which would also appear in the magazine as does any story or poem. So, you would get exposure not only on YouTube, but also in the online magazine.

I don’t know how I would work podcasts, but I am open to proposals.

Finally, another way you can contribute is by submitting ideas for the website or proposals for things to be published. I don’t have any way of compensating anyone for ideas or proposals, except for some type of exposure–maybe. If in doubt, submit.

At this time, The Chamber has no volunteer program, but that may be possible in the distant future.

Check this page occasionally as I will sporadically post updates and new ideas as the occur to me.

Thank you for your time.

New Tagline for The Chamber “the strange and dark and beautiful”

Just a quick note to let everyone know that The Chamber’s tagline (“Contemporary Dark Fiction and Poetry”) is being supplanted by a new one: “the strange and dark and beautiful”. You may see these two switching out in a lot of places over time. For now, I am using it just on The Chamber’s homepage.

I got the phrase from one of The Chamber’s contributors, Patrick Crossen, whose story, “His Assistant”, was published by The Chamber on September 2 (check out the story if you have a few minutes). In his cover letter for the story, Patrick stated:

Please find enclosed my short story, “His Assistant ”. It’s a reworking of a common trope with a fresh angle that I had a lot of fun writing. Due do your magazine’s tendency to lean toward the strange and dark and beautiful, I think it would be a good fit for your magazine.

Received by Phil Slattery, Fiction by Patrick Crossen “His Assistant”, 20 June 2022.

That phrase resonated with me and has stuck in my mind since then. It struck me as a simple, concise, and powerful way of stating what I had not realized The Chamber was truly about until I read it. So, this evening, I sent Patrick an email asking permission to use it, which he graciously granted.

Over time, I will be using this and probably some variations here and there. You will see them pop up occasionally on this website, in The Chamber’s social media, and on merchandise as I test out its suitability in various places.

Thank you for taking the time to read this. Have a wonderful rest of your day.

Drop by The Chamber’s Bookstore if you have the chance.

New Page: Support

Support The Chamber Magazine

Today, I added a Support Page to The Chamber. Check it out. Below is the text from it.

You can support The Chamber in several ways.

Obviously, the first form of support that comes to anyone’s mind is financial support. You can do this through buying something from The Chamber’s gift shop or by making a financial donation through Stripe (in homepage sidebar) or through Buy Me a Book. The funds will be used to improve and upgrade The Chamber in many ways including Search Engine Optimization, web design, software for graphics and communication, advertising (possibly at a later date), and doubtlessly many others that are not occurring to my coffee-starved mind (it’s 8:43 a.m. as I write this).

However there are also other ways as well.

Share a story or poem. The most basic (and arguably the best and least expensive) form of publicity is by word of mouth. If you see a story or poem or article that you like, share it on social media. This can be as quick and easy as hitting a link below the story/poem. You can also mention The Chamber in any comments you make on other websites or social media. If you buy a t-shirt or other bit of merchandise from the gift shop, wear it in public at every opportunity. You are limited only by your imagination and the odds are you are creative are good as you are reading this magazine at the moment.

Another way to support The Chamber is to contribute something to be published. Of course, I will have to exercise editorial discretion over what is to be published, but the better your work is, the better the chance of it being published (don’t forget to check the guidelines for updates before you submit). The wider the variety of contributions, the more exposure the magazine receives. Don’t forget that The Chamber doesn’t publish only stories and poems, but reviews, interviews, articles, essays, and anything else that might be of interest to a reader of dark matter. They all have their own readership.

Don’t forget that The Chamber also has a nascent YouTube channel (. I wouldn’t mind publishing short videos there, which would also appear in the magazine as does any story or poem. So, you would get exposure not only on YouTube, but also in the online magazine.

I don’t know how I would work podcasts, but I am open to proposals.

Finally, another way you can contribute is by submitting ideas for the website or proposals for things to be published. I don’t have any way of compensating anyone for ideas or proposals, except for some type of exposure–maybe. If in doubt, submit.

At this time, The Chamber has no volunteer program, but that may be possible in the distant future.

Check this page occasionally as I will sporadically post updates and new ideas as the occur to me.

Thank you for your time.